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The Klahoose First Nation

The Klahoose peoples have lived here on the central west coast of British Columbia since time before memory. Klahoose First Nation territories span from Cortes Island to the Toba Valley in proximity to our neighbours of the Homalco and Tla’amin Nations.  Klahoose Wilderness Resort and Klahoose Coastal Adventures are proudly Klahoose First Nation owned and operated business. Many of our staff and team are Klahoose and have received comprehensive training to ensure your safety and comfort during your time in our territories.  We invite you to see the beauty of the BC coast through our eyes, and experience the shared traditions and stories history handed down through generations.  Klahoose Wilderness Resort awaits your visit. 

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ʔi:mot tətᶿ kʷənome...

it’s good to see you!

Welcome to the traditional Klahoose Nation territory, which extends from Toba Inlet in Desolation Sound and Northern islands of the Strait of Georgia on Coastal British Columbia. Our Nation ‘s permanent community resides in Squirrel Cove, on Cortes Island, BC. 

 

The Klahoose Nation has lived since time before memory on lands, waters and air that make up their abundant territories. A place where our ancestors’ spirit soars and can be heard in the wind as it rustles the treetops and guides our people. 

 

The Klahoose Elders remember vividly a time when their Big Houses stood on the shores of Toba Inlet. Today, most of our population lives in the main village in Squirrel Cove on the East shores of Cortes Island.  Members of our nation also reside in the coastal communities of Powell River, Campbell River, Vancouver’s Lower Mainland and Washington state. 

 

Years of restrictive legislation forbid practicing most Klahoose cultural traditions which has significantly impacted our Nation. To combat this cultural loss, the Klahoose has embarked on a journey to rejuvenate its traditions, language, and identity. We are hopeful and delighted to see our youth’s eagerness to reconnect the threads of their past to the framework of modern life. 
The Klahoose Wilderness Resort’s visitors to our territory strengthen our opportunities while supporting our efforts.

 

On behalf of the Klahoose Council and membership, we extend a warm welcome and much gratitude. We wish you safe travels and hope you enjoy your time with us. 


Chief Kevin Peacey
Klahoose First Nation

Klahoose Wilderness Resort - Toba Inlet
Klahoose Wilderness Resort - Toba Inlet
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Desolation Sound and 

Toba Inlet

Klahoose First Nation territories span from Cortes Island to the Toba Valley in proximity to our neighbours of the Homalco and Tla’amin Nations and includes portions of the Discovery Islands and Desolation Sound and the northern end of the Salish Sea.

Desolation Sound name was given by Captain George Vancouver however the Coast Salish people have lived here since time immemorial.  Village sites through the sound have been seasonal homes for hundreds and even thoughts of First Nation people.  Today Desolation Sound is renowned for its natural beauty, abundant wildlife are woven into the fabric of the people that have lived here for thousands of years before European contact.

Desolation Sound Marine Provincial Park has been know by boater as some of the calmest and warmest waters on the Pacific Coast.

 

Yekwamen (yɛkʷamɛn) or Toba Inlet has been the home of the Klahoose people since time before memory. This is one of the principle inlets on the BC coast. Toba Inlet is relatively short in comparison to other major coastal inlets with an average with 2.5 km and length only about 35 km. At the mouth of the inlets is the Toba River and Klite River. The inlet is flanked by tower glacier peaks with cascading waterfalls and is home to many grizzly bears.

 

Klahoose Wilderness Resort sits on the remote shores and calm waters of Homfray Channel (Thee chum mi yich – meaning further back inside), just north of the Desolation Sound Provincial Marine Park and just south of Yekwamen (Toba Inlet) in the lush rainforest and coast mountain range.